Once more, with feeling…

Yes+Fist3 years ago today, we voted YES to a more compassionate Ireland.

We listened to people’s stories and experiences, and said YES to removing the constraints that caused them suffering and denied them their freedoms.

In 3 days, we have the chance to do that again, to remove from our constitution an amendment that has failed in its aims, and only contributed more grief, pain, suffering and trauma to the women of Ireland.

On Friday, we have the chance, the last chance, to change that. Once more, with feeling – vote YES for a more compassionate Ireland. On Friday, repeal the 8th.

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Western Jihad: Islam for Dummies

I didn’t leave my house today. I woke up to the news – my day was a write off. My heart breaks for Syria, Palestine, Afghanistan.. It broke for Paris on the 13th of November 2015, and i…

Source: Western Jihad: Islam for Dummies

Reaching out is key to preventing suicide

Today, 10th September, is World Suicide Prevention Day. Reaching out for help or reaching out to help – even with a few simple words – can save lives.

Image: Aware on Facebook. http://www.aware.ie

Yesterday, my doctor asked me straight out: “Are you suicidal?” I was talking to him, among other things, about the resurgence of depression I’ve experienced since being hit by a car four weeks ago. As low as I’ve been at times lately, the question still took me a little by surprise. I didn’t have to think about the answer. I told him straight out: “No.”

That answer doesn’t come as easy to everyone. Worryingly, the opposite answer comes too easily to many people. And more worryingly still, some of those people feel they need to keep that answer to themselves. Every year, more than 800,000 people worldwide die by suicide – about 1 person every 40 seconds – and for every one person who dies, there are over 20 more people who attempt to. It doesn’t have to happen.

Reaching Out and Saving Lives is the theme of this year’s World Suicide Prevention Day. In her video message to launch the day, Prof. Ella Arensman, President of the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) pointed out that:

“For many people who survive a suicide attempt, their main intent was not to die but to have a different life. This important insight should encourage all of us… to reach out to support people improving their quality of life.”

In the Mind Matters section of this blog, I’ve written quite a bit about how important communication is in not only breaking down the stigma around mental health issues but also breaking down the isolation that is so often at the heart of depression. When depression gets to the life-and-death level of suicide, that communication becomes the most urgent and maybe most powerful tool in saving people’s lives. The recent story of the Dublin teenager who asked a suicidal man “Are you okay?” is testament to that.

That’s the beginning of reaching out. Even just those three words. And it can work either way. Whether you are worried for someone else’s safety or whether you are worried for your own, three words – “Are you okay?” or “I’m not okay” – could quite literally save a person’s life. It can be the beginning of that different life. Instead of dying, that man is now expecting a child, already named after the kid who asked him if he was okay.

Don’t wait for someone to reach out to you. Whether you’re reaching out to help or reaching out for help, you can always reach out first.


Image: Aware on Facebook www.aware.ie
Image: Aware on Facebook http://www.aware.ie

Here are some useful links and resources.

There are plenty of mental health and suicide prevention organisations and groups in Ireland. If you or someone you know needs to, please get in touch with one of these organisations, or find the ones local to you.

Pieta House:  step-by-step action plans and immediate supports both for people who are self-harming or suicidal and for people who are worried about a friend. www.pieta.ie

Aware: Depression, anxiety and bipolar support and information. Suicide Hotline: 1890 303 302 www.aware.ie

Samaritans: Phone, text or face-to-face emotional support. Suicide Hotline116123, Text 0872609090 www.samaritans.org

Console: Counselling, bereavement support, support groups. Suicide Hotline: 1800 247 247 or text HELP to 51444 www.console.ie

Reach Out (online youth mental health service) ie.reachout.com

HSE mental health website: www.yourmentalhealth.ie

No Country for Old Men: Yeats, Joyce and Hugh Lane

As William Butler Yeats turns 150, an exhibition at the Hugh Lane is a little like having the poet as a tour guide

William Butler Yeats, 1933
William Butler Yeats, 1933

You would hardly know it was three days to Bloomsday. The middle of June in Dublin is usually infused with Joycean events and readings and articles, but this year, the face in the arts pages, banners and posters is not James Joyce but W.B. Yeats. Fair enough, though. Tuesday might be the annual celebration of Joyce’s masterwork, but today would have been Yeats’ 150th birthday.

I admit I’m not hugely knowledgeable on either. I’ve read and reread Portrait of the Artist… and Dubliners, but dipped no more than a toe in the “snotgreen… scrotumtightening sea” of Ulysses. I’m fine with the fact that I’ll die without attempting Finnegan’s Wake. The Yeats poems I know best are still the ones we studied at school – Sailing to Byzantium, September 1913 and When You are Old – and even though I loved mythology as a kid, I sometimes find his mythological and spiritualist allusions a little too cerebral for my tastes. For me, Yeats dealt more with the grandiose – with idealism and politics and nationalism – whereas Joyce was more rooted in mundane and intimate humanity, and it might be for that reason that I feel more of an affinity with Joyce’s writings.

That said, an accidental encounter with Yeats this week was a disarmingly intimate and personal one.  Continue reading

Societal shift: When Ireland came out for equality

Even before the marriage equality referendum, the Yes campaign had already raised the status of LGBT people in Irish society for good

Photo credit: © Brian Lawless/Newscom

After casting my vote for marriage equality last week, I took off at dawn on Saturday to spend a few days with my godson and his parents. Other than a few snatched moments of internet access, I had little connection to what was happening at home. But I talked with my friends about what was happening, about what I hoped and what I feared might happen. I told my godson’s father about how I was worried the vote would be a lot closer than the polls showed, that a silent No vote could hold sway. He said something that gave me some hope. He said that even if it came to the worst, even if it was a No, it wouldn’t be a No for long. Eventually, he predicted, equality would come, because something amazing had already happened and Irish society had already changed.

I knew he was right. I’d seen that change. We’ve all see it. Over the last few months, Ireland’s LGBT community has come out en masse – with all the uncertain and nerve-wracking courage and bravery that must take – come out to ask for acceptance. Not tolerancea distinction made brilliantly by American activist Ash Beckham – but acceptance, to be inclusively treated as equal citizens in Irish society. There was no ignoring or denying the scale of that movement: Yes or No on the day, the closet door was open for good.

Continue reading

Eco Logic: Approaching a sustainable future for Ireland

Note: This post was written as part of the World Bank Group’s Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided. It serves as an introduction to this  blog’s new Eco Logic tab and a portal to the five Climate Conversations posts
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Ireland is neither the most vulnerable not the responsible country when it comes to climate change. But like every country, climate change will – and already is – having an impact. We have a role to play minimising that impact, both on our own shores and as part of a global effort.

As an island, Ireland is vulnerable to sea level rise, and to flooding and extreme coastal erosion due to Atlantic storm surges – as was witnessed by a series of storms in the winter of 2013/4. Such events are already occurring with greater frequency well before we reach even 1 degree of the projected 2-4 dregree global mean temperature rise.

There are, however, great opportunities for Ireland in adapting to its changing climate. Continue reading

What would Jesus vote?

As Ireland votes on marriage equality, is the religious objection really as clear-cut as it seems?

Yesterday, someone very close to me said that, because of his religious beliefs he couldn’t bring himself to vote Yes. He had made his mind up to vote No because he believed it was what Jesus would do.

Two women kiss outside Trinity College Dublin as a ‘no’ protestor waves a placard above their heads. James Delaney/Twitter

I left the religious issue out of yesterday’s post because this is a referendum purely on the issue of civil marriage and that is what we need to focus on. But the reality is, many people will vote based on religious beliefs. In pamphlets, statements and homilies, bishops and priests have advised mass-goers to vote No, to preserve traditional religious understandings of marriage, even though religious marriage is not at stake in this referendum. For many people who believe they have God on their side, the rest of the discussion is irrelevant.

I was a Christian myself for the first 19 years of my life, but I’ve been an atheist for the last 19 and so I don’t have anyone quite of the status of Jesus to offer as an alternative voice. But I do still wonder: Would Jesus really vote No? Continue reading